This Week in Dinosaur News: Jurassic World, Dinosaur Videos and Pranks, Triassic Tropics, and More

Here’s what came out this week in dinosaur news:

  • Chris Pratt got pranked by dinosaurs, according to SomeEcards
  • The Awesomer shared a new web series, called Living with Dinosaurs (see the Youtube channel here)
  • Utah U and Fox reported on why dinosaurs during part of the Triassic didn’t live in the tropics
  • Topless Robot compiled a list of 17 dinosaur cameos in movies, games, and more
  • Forbes reported on the evolution of dinosaurs games
  • Jurassic World broke box office records, according to The Guardian
  • CNN posted a list of the top 10 dinosaur museums in the world (Royal Belgian Institute is third)
  • Dreadnoughtus may not have been as heavy as previously thought, according to Royal Society
  • Deadline and CinemaBlend reported on why Pixar changes its Good Dinosaur cast
  • Wired and OregonLive reported on Professor Leonard Finkelman, who teaches a dinosaur philosophy class
  • Washington Post shared why paleontologists like the inaccurate dinosaurs of Jurassic Park and Jurassic World
  • Josh Cotton launched his Doodling Dino Youtube channel, featuring an updated version of velociraptor from Jurassic Park
  • Die Hard Games has a Kickstarter campaign for its dinosaur game, Apex
  • Jurassic World used motion capture for its dinosaurs, according to Wired
  • Dinosaurs may have been bright colors, like red or pink, according to MSN
  • Mondo Gallery had a special When Dinosaurs Ruled the World exhibiti
  • Smithsonian printed a 3D skeleton of Spinosaurus for its exhibit, and there are multiple 3D models for Spinosaurus

I Know Dino Podcast Show Notes: Corythosaurus (Episode 31)

Episode 31 is all about Corythosaurus, a “duck-billed” hadrosaur.

You can listen to our free podcast, with all our episodes, on iTunes at:

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/i-know-dino/id960976813?mt=2

In this episode, we discuss:

  • The dinosaur of the day: Corythosaurus, a hadrosaur (“duck-billed”) dinosaur that lived in the Cretaceous, in North America
  • Fossils found in Canada (southern Alberta)
  • But it seems no bones found outside southern Alberta, so may have only lived in one small area
  • Name means “helmet lizard”
  • Type species is Corythosaurus casuarius
  • Name casuarius comes from cassowary
  • Corythosaurus has an estimated length of 9 metres (30 ft), and has a skull, including the crest, that is 70.8 centimetres (27.9 in) tall
  • May have weighed up to 5 tons
  • Barnum Brown described Corythosaurus in 1914
  • Brown found the holotype specimen in 1911 (though there are many complete specimens); holotype is missing last part of tail and part of forelimbs, but has impressions of scales
  • 30 feet (9 m) long, with a skull (including crest) that is about 28 in (71 cm) tall
  • Corythosaurus crests look like crests of a cassowary
  • Crest probably used for vocalization (amplifies sound)
  • Holotype specimen is now in the American Museum of Natural History, along with a second specimen Brown and Peter Kaisen found in 1914. They are “in their original death poses”
  • Brown described the second specimen in 1916 (more detailed description of Corythosaurus)
  • Charles H. Sternberg found 2 well preserved specimens in 1912, but they were lost in 1916 as they were being shipped to paleontologist Arthur Smith Woodward the UK, during WWI (ship was sunk by German merchant raider)
  • Holotype specimen sides and tail had scales
  • Use to be 7 different Corythosaurus species (C. casuarius, C. bicristatus, C. brevicristatus, C. excavatus, C. frontalis, C. intermedius
  • More than 20 Corythossaurus skulls have been found
  • In 1975 Peter Dodson studied the species and found that the different sizes and shapes may have been due to gender and age, so now only one species is recognized. However, some studies say C. intermedius is its own species because it lived slightly later than C. casuarius, and it slightly different
  • Brown originally classified Corythosaurus as part of the family Trachodontidae (now Hadrosauridae), but then he found it was possbily an ancestor to Hypacrosaurus (very similar except for development of vertebrae and limb proportions),. Now Corythosaurus is part of the family Lambeosaurinae (most of which have similar skulls and crests)
  • Holotype specimen was a carcass that floated up on a beach (shells, water-worn bones and baenid turtle preserved near it
  • Scientists used to think Corythosaurus lived in water (seemed to have webbed hands and feet), but the webs were actually deflated padding, seen on modern mammals; theory was that they could swim in deep water and use the crest to store air
  • Corythosaurus probably lived in woodland forest, may have visited swampy areas
  • Probably bipedal, with short arms and long tail (could walk on all fours, possibly to eat low-lying plants
  • Probably picky about what it ate (juicy fruits and young leaves)
  • Narrow, toothless beak with hundreds of cheek teeth
  • Used its beak to eat soft vegetation
  • One Corythosaurus has been preserved with its last meal in its chest cavity. Found remains of conifer needles, seeds, twigs, and fruits (debate over what it actually ate)
  • Probably was cathemeral, great sense of hearing
  • Cathemeral based on sclerotic rings (bony circles), which are in many reptiles, birds and dinosaurs (probably help with pupil)
  • Being cathemeral, may have eaten small amounts of food at a time to digest quickly, also easier to live alongside other herbivores that were diurnal or nocturnal
  • Herding animal, may have gone to higher ground to reproduce
  • Predators may have been Albertosaurus or Tyrannosaurus, or Troodon (especially to juveniles)
  • Crest has extended tubes (complex nasal passages)
  • Head crest is hollow, so it’s a lambeosaurine (subfamily)
  • Hollowness may have reduced weight of crest (if crest was used as display)
  • Other lambeosaurines include Parasaurolophus
  • May have called out warnings or to attract mates or to let others know about food
  • Males had larger crests than females
  • Size and shape of crest varied based on gender and age
  • Scientists think it made loud, low pitch sounds “like a wind or brass instrument” (trombone)
  • Started growing its crests when it reached half the size of adults
  • Ohio University did a CT scan in 2008 that found Corythosaurus had a “delicate inner ear” and could “hear low-frequency” sounds
  • No real defense mechanisms
  • Scott Persons from the University of Alberta found that Corythosaurus had smaller strides than tyrannosaurids, but they had more endurance so for long pursuits they lasted longer
  • Matt Davis from Yale University suggested there are so many fossilized impressions/skin samples of hadrosaurs because they had tougher textures compared to other dinosaurs
  • He reviewed reports about dinosaur skin from 1841 and found that in 180 reports, 46 percent of the fossils with skin were hadrosaurs
  • Also looked at data from 343 dinosaurs from the Hell Creek Formation, 20 of the 22 dinosaurs with skin fossils were hadrosaurs (91 percent)
  • Hadrosauridae (duck billed dinosaurs) is a family of common herbivores from the Cretaceous whose fossils have been found in Asia, Europe, and North America
  • Descendants of iguanodontian dinosaurs and had a similar body layout
  • Hadrosauids were the first dinosaur family identified in North America (1855-56 found fossil teeth); Joseph Leidy studied the teeth and named the genera Trachodon and Thespesius, though Trachodon had ceratopsids too and is no longer considered a valid genus
  • In 1858, associated those teeth with Hadrosaurus foulkii (named after William Parker Foulke)
  • Edward Drinker Cope used the name Hadrosauridae in 1869
  • One nearly complete specimen found in 1999 in the Hell Creek Formation (nicknamed “Dakota”), scientists were able to calculate its muscle mass. Had fossilized skin, ligaments, tendons and some internal organs
  • Two subfamilies: lambeosaurins (hollow crests) and saurolophines with solid crests (pre-2010 most hardosaurines classified as saurolophines)
  • Had lots of teeth in the back of the mouth to chew up food (made this group very successful, compared to sauropods in the Cretaceous)
  • Mark Purnell found in 2009 that hadrosaurs had a hinge between its upper haws and skull, and the upper jaw pushed outwards and sideways when chewing while the lower jaw slid against the upper teeth
  • Vincent Williams, Paul Barrett and Mark Purnell found in 2009 that hadrosaurids probably ate horsetails and low lying vegetation (based on how it chews), instead of twigs or stems
  • But this contradicts the finding of the hadrosaur with stomach contents, so it’s up for debate
  • Coprolites found some hadrosaurs ate rotting wood (had fungi and detritus-eating invertebrates)
  • Fun fact: Dinosaurs may have been brightly colored (even red or pink)

I Know Dino Podcast Show Notes: Triceratops (Episode 30)

Episode 30 is all about Triceratops, a ceratopsian with three horns on its face.

You can listen to our free podcast, with all our episodes, on iTunes at:

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/i-know-dino/id960976813?mt=2

In this episode, we discuss:

  • The dinosaur of the day: Triceratops, a dinosaur that appeared in Jurassic World, whose name means “Three-Horn Face”
  • Have mentioned Triceratops before, about  Triceratops v Torosaurus (Episode 21, with paleo-artist Josh Cotton)
  • Two species types: Triceratops horridus and Triceratops prorsus
  • Charles Marsh named Triceratops in 1889
  • Quadrupedal (walked on four legs), herbivore, large skull (about a third of the length of its body)
  • Grouped as a chasmosaurine because of the brow horns (a subfamily of ceratopsid)
  • Lived in Cretaceous; one of the last dinosaurs to go extinct
  • Found in USA,‭ ‬Colorado,‭ ‬Montana,‭ ‬South Dakota,‭ ‬Wyoming.‭ ‬Canada,‭ ‬Alberta,‭ ‬Saskatchewan
  • About 30 feet (9 m) and weighed over 11,000 pounds (5,000 kg), though some weighed 15,750 pounds
  • Skull had a short neck frill, and three horns
  • Two biggest horns above the eyes, up to 1 m long, and a smaller nose horn on the snout
  • Dominant herbivore in North America in late Cretaceous (lots of Triceratops remains)
  • Triceratops is one of the most popular dinosaurs (but lots of misconceptions and controversy)
  • In the 1900s a lot of Triceratops fossils were found, though the skulls varied a lot. As a result, a lot of Triceratops species were named. But in 1986 paleontologists Ostrom and Wellnhofer wrote that only the type species, Triceratops horridus, was real (variation in skulls were a mix of individual variation and fossils being distorted over time)
  • Triceratops horridus means “rough”, for the rough texture of bones
  • 16 Triceratops species proposed since Triceratops was discovered, but only 2 are widely considered valid. Triceratops horridus probably evolved into Triceratops prorsus over 1-2 million years, according to a 2014 study in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences journal (study examined fossils from the Hell Creek Formation, with lower, middle and upper geological subdivisions (middle subdivision fossils had a combo of features found in the lower and upper subdivisions)
  • Catherine Forster wrote in a later study about a difference between Triceratops horridus, Triceratops prorsus, and Triceratops hatcheri (named as a new genus, Nedoceratops hatcheri); they were found in different levels of strata, which means they were active at different times
  • Dubious species: T.‭ ‬albertensis,‭ ‬T.‭ ‬alticornis,‭ ‬T.‭ ‬eurycephalus,‭ ‬T.‭ ‬galeus,‭ ‬T.‭ ‬hatcheri,‭ ‬T.‭ ‬ingens,‭ ‬T.‭ ‬maximus,‭ ‬T.‭ ‬sulcatus.
  • Debate over Triceratops v. Torosaurus
  • John Scanella theorized in 2009 that Triceratops was the same as Torosaurus (co-authored by Jack Horner). They said they lived at the same time, and fossils were found in the same places, and that Triceratops was a juvenile version of Torosaurus. They said that Triceratops had a short frill, and Torosaurus had a longer frill with holes to reduce the weight. Also said that Nedoceratops was a growth stage in between Triceratops and Torosaurus. Evidence to support the theory is that some ceratopsians juvenile and adult specimens have juveniles with short frills and adults with longer frills.
  • Theory was very controversial
  • In 2011 Andrew Farke said Nedoceratops was in its own genus, and there was too much change required for a Triceratops skull to change to a Torosaurus skull
  • In 2012 Daniel Field and Nicholas Longrich, from Yale University studied 35 specimens and said there were skulls of juvenile Torosaurus and adult Triceratops. Also in some locations only Triceratops or only Torosaurus was found.
  • Scanella responded that some of the fossils Field and Longrich studied could be transitional
  • Either way, Torosaurus was named in 1891, and Triceratops in 1889, which means Triceratops will keep its name, no matter what
  • Triceratops fossil was found in Wyoming in the 1880s and shipped to the Smithsonian museum in D.C. (on display since 1905; first mounted Triceratops in the world. Original display had “skeletal elements from over a dozen different individual Triceratops, some of which weren’t the same size and gave us bones that were too small for the skeleton” according to the website, and had “several sculpted elements that technicians made by hand, and the foot bones of a different dinosaur, a duckbill dinosaur, to replace missing Triceratops bones.” Unveiled a new mount in 2001 that was more accurate (nicknamed “Hatcher”)
  • Scientists used to think Triceratops walked with its two front legs sprawled out, to support its weight. But nowadays scientists think that Triceratops walked upright, with elbows bowed out to the sides (like a rhino)
  • Had hoof-like claws; thick, bumpy hide; large brows
  • 2006 study in journal Proceedings of the Roayl Society found that Triceratops brow horns twisted and lengthened with age (started off stubby, then curved backward, then pointed in the opposite direction)
  • Scientists have discovered a Triceratops skin impression, which has bristle-like fibers (around the tail)
  • Triceratops toes on the front two feet pointed to the sides, and not forwards (like stegosaurs, ankylosaurs and sauropods). This is considered to be a primitive trait, and it shows that ceratopsian’s direct ancestors were bipedal (used hands for grasping and support, instead of supporting weight)
  • May have charged at predators, like a rhino
  • Large enough that only large predators could attack (Tyrannosaurus and Albertosaurus)
  • Many Triceratops bones were damaged by fighting with predators
  • Evidence that Triceratops and T-rex fought. One Triceratops had healed T-rex tooth marks on brow horn, bitten horn was broken and had new bone growth after the break (Triceratops may have had the advantage in the fight because of sharp horns)
  • The frill protected its neck from T-rex and other predators
  • Horns and frill may have been defensive weapons, though not all scientists agree that this was the sole or main reason for them (ceratopsians as a group have very different looking frills and horns, and the argument is they would have evolved to become the same, and be most effective)
  • Horns and frill may have been used for display (identify its own species); frills also have been found with blood vessel impressions to “produce vivid color displays”
  • Large frill may have regulated body temperature (possibly)
  • Some Triceratops have been found with holes in the frills, possibly caused by combat among Triceratops
  • A new chasmosaurine called Regaliceratops peterhewsi was discovered and published about in Current Biology on June 15. New dinosaur had a crown of plates around its head and have features it independently evolved (convergent evolution), which may show similar behaviors in other chasmosaurines, like fighting styles (modern mammals with similar shaped horns act similarly with horn locking or head butting)
  • Often thought of as a herding animal, but no definitive evidence for this. Many Triceratops fossils found as individuals
  • Other horned dinosaurs known to live in herds (found bonebeds with 2 to hundreds or thousands of individuals)
  • Triceratops needed a lot of food to survive, which would be hard to consume as a large herd
  • However, Triceratops may have lived in small groups (one male and multiple females); males may have fought each other for dominance (idea based on modern animals)
  • Three juvenile Triceratops found in southeastern Montana; in 2012 another group of 3 Triceratops found (small juvenile and adult) in Wyoming–may have been a family, also signs of a T-rex scavenging, puncture wounds from teeth in the largest Triceratops‘ front limbs
  • Unclear how Triceratops raised its young
  • Ate low growing vegetation, but may have taken down larger plants to get to food it could not reach with just its teeth
  • Had a parrot-like beak, and battery of teeth (many molars and pre-molars stacked tightly together and used for grinding leaves) at back of the mouth (continually replaced teeth)
  • A new study in the journal Science Advances found that Triceratops had teeth that could slice through dense material (more varied diet than modern reptiles). Professor Erickson and colleagues studied Triceratops teeth from museums around North America. They found Triceratops teeth had five layers of tissue (compared to horse and bison, which have 4 layers, and crocodiles that have 2)
  • Probably couldn’t move too fast, and spent lots of time grazing (like a rhino)
  • Easy to find Triceratops fossils (47 skulls found in Hell Creek between 2000-2010)
  • In 1889, a rancher in Wyoming found a strange skull on his property and tried to lasso its horns to haul it off (the horn snapped off)
  • Triceratops fossils are in high demand. In 1997, an average skull cost $2500. In 2008 someone purchased a Triceratops for $1 million and donated it to the Boston Museum of Science
  • Triceratops is the offical state fossil of South Dakota and is also Wyoming’s state dinosaur
  • Ancestors may have been Zuniceratops (earliest known ceratopsian with brow horns) and Yinlong, first known ceratopsian from Jurassic era
  • Pentaceratops aquilonius may also be an ancestor (from episode 15)
  • Ceratopsians were ornithiscians
  • Lived in North America and Asia
  • They had beaks and cheek teeth to eat fiberous vegetation
  • Also had a frill (used for defense, regulating body temperature, attracting mates, or signaling danger)
  • Probably traveled in herds and could then stampede if threatened
  • Chasmosaurinae is a subfamily of ceratopsid
  • Chasmosaurinae had large brow horns and long frills (compared to centrosaurines, another subfamily of ceratopsid, which had short brow horns and shorter frills with long spines coming out of the frills)
  • Chasmosaurine fossils have been found in western Canada, the western United States, and northern Mexico.
  • Fun Fact: Dinosaurs had two ovaries (laid 2 eggs), but birds evolved to have only one ovary, to help with flight.

I Know Dino Podcast Show Notes: Indominus Rex, Jurassic World (Episode 29)

Episode 29 is all about the latest dinosaur movie, Jurassic World. (Contains spoilers.)

You can listen to our free podcast, with all our episodes, on iTunes at:

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/i-know-dino/id960976813?mt=2

In this episode, we discuss:

  • The dinosaur of the day: Indominus Rex, a new hybrid dinosaur whose name means “fierce or untamable king”
  • Indominus Rex is a mix Carnotaurus, Majungasaurus, Rugops, Giganotosaurus, Velociraptor, a frog (for thermal regulation) and a cuttlefish (for camoflauge)
  • Can run up to 30 mph
  • Has a roar of 140-160 db (same as 747 taking off and landing)
  • Colin Trevorrow, director, worked with paleontologist Jack Horner to make Indominus Rex
  • Jack Horner is looking to turn a chicken embryo into a dinosaur (scientists have already turned a chicken beak into a dinosaur snout, as well as perching digits, and teeth
  • Review of Jurassic World: great, entertaining movie (probably 2nd best in the Jurassic Park franchise, and definitely worth seeing

I Know Dino Podcast Show Notes: Hypsilophodon (Episode 28)

Episode 28 is all about Hypsilophodon, a fast-running dinosaur.

You can listen to our free podcast, with all our episodes, on iTunes at:

https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/i-know-dino/id960976813?mt=2

In this episode, we discuss:

  • The dinosaur of the day: Hypsilophodon, an ornithopod, whose name means “Hypsilophus-tooth”
  • Lived in the early Cretaceous, in what is now England
  • Type species is Hypsilophodon foxii, named in 1869-70
  • Found in the Wessex Formation in the Isle of Wight
  • Almost 100 specimens have been found on the Isle of Wight (over 20 dinosaur species found there)
  • 20 Hypsilophodon specimens have been found in one place, where they died together (may have been in quicksand)
  • Reverend William Fox, discovered the 1868 specimen (with skull), so the type species is named after him
  • Small, bipedal, about 5.9 feet (1.8 meters) long, weighed about 45 pounds (20 kg)
  • Agile runner, and had a sharp beak it used to bite off vegetation
  • Herbivore, and possibly an omnivore
  • Lots of misconceptions: scientists used to think Hypsilophodon climbed trees and was armored
  • First found in 1849, and two pieces were sold (one to naturalist James Scott Bowerbank); at the time, they thought it was the bones of a young Iguanodon (Mantell described it as an Iguandon in 1849, as did Richard Owen in 1855)
  • Paleontologist Thomas Henry Huxley wrote a more comprehensive description in 1870 (after studying the skull); Huxley was the first to note that Ornithischians had pubic bones that pointed backwards, like birds
  • Huxley chose the name Hypsilophodon because he wanted it to be similar to Iguanodon’s name (means iguana-tooth) so he chose named the dinosaur after an “extant herbivorous lizard”
  • Richard Owen still thought Hypsilophodon was not a different genus, and renamed it in 1874 Iguanodon foxii, but scientists rejected it (John Whitaker Hulke had more specimens from Fox)
  • In 1874 Hulke described Hypsilophodon as armored, but in 2008 Galton wrote the armor was actually from the torso, “an example of internal intercostal plates associated with the rib cage. It consists of thin mineralized circular plates growing from the back end of the middle rib shaft and overlapping the front edge of the subsequent rib”
  • In 1882 Hulke said Hypsilophodon was probably quadrupedal, but also climbed rocks and trees (because of its grasping hand). In 1912 paleontologist Othenio Abel said it was a aroboreal animal, and in 1916 Gerhard Heilmann said it lived like a modern tree kangaroo. But in 1926 Heilmann changed his mind and said the first toe was not opposable because it was “firmly connected to the second”. In 1927 Abel denied this description, and in 1936 Swinton said even though the first metatarsal was forward pointing it might have a moveable toe. In 1969 Peter M. Galton analyzed the skeleton, and described Hypsilophon as not being able to climb, but instead a bipedal runner.
  • Most Hypsilophodon specimens were found between 1849 and 1921, and are now in the Natural History Museum in London (about 20)
  • 1967 Peter Malcolm Galton published his thesis on Hypsilophodon, starting modern research on the dinosaur
  • In 1978-79, Galton and James Jensen named another Hypsilophodon species, Hypsilophodon wielandi, after George Reber Wieland found a thigh bone in South Dakota. They thought Hypsilophodon wielandi was proof of a land bridge between North America and Europe, but now the specimen is considered an “indeterminate basal ornithopod”
  • Hypsilophodon had primitive features, such as five digits on each hand and four digits on each foot (its fifth finger was opposable and could grab food); had a beak like other ornithischians, but also had five teeth in its premaxilla (front of the upper jaw)–most other herbivores in its time no longer had these front teeth)
  • Had a large eye socket, and thin, pointy bones over the top half of its eyes to give it shade (and make it look fierce)
  • Short, large skull, with a triangular snout, and a beak
  • Beak-like mouth means it may have been choosy about what to eat
  • Had 28-30 fan-shaped teeth (continually replaced)
  • May have had cheeks, to help it chew food
  • Because it was small, at low-growing plants (probably liked shoots and roots, like modern deer)
  • May have been semi-quadrapedal when eating low growing plants
  • May have eaten seeds (cycads, cone-like seed plants)
  • Probably moved in large groups; dubbed the “deer of the Mesozoic”
  • Not much known about its habitat
  • Possible predators: Eotyrannus, Neovenator, Baryonyx
  • Related species had neatly arranged nests (no Hypsilophodon nests have been found), so may have cared for eggs before hatching
  • One of the fastest types of dinosaur, probably
  • Had a body built for running; light weight, long legs, stiff tail (for balance); may be the best ornithischian adapted to running
  • When running, kept its spine horizontally level to the ground (long tail would help counterbalance)
  • Can see a mounted skeleton at Dinosaur Isle, “Britain’s first purpose built dinosaur museum and visitor attraction; based in Sandown on the Isle of Wight”
  • Hypsilophodonts were small, long, bipedal herbivores (some made burrows for their young, like Oryctodromeous (episode 2)
  • Lived in the middle Jurassic to late Cretaceous
  • Fossils have been found in Asia, Australia, Europe, New Zealand, North America, and South America
  • Fun Fact: All dinosaurs laid eggs. About 40 kinds of dinosaur eggs have been discovered. (there are ~1,000 discovered so far, so there are still a lot of unknowns [including ceratopsians])

This Week in Dinosaur News: Dinosaur Feathers, T-rex Autopsy, Jurassic Park, Best Dinosaur Movies and Books, and More

Here’s what came out this week in dinosaur news:

  • Evolution of dinosaur feathers, according to Royal Society Publishing and Phys.org
  • Interactive map of dinosaur tracks on Yahoo
  • New carnivore discovered in Wales on display, according to BBC
  • Fossilera reported on Torvosaurus, a dinosaur as big as T-rex, but much older
  • Preserved soft tissue of dinosaurs found, according to Nature
  • The Guardian reported on how National Geographic built the T-rex for the autopsy show
  • A history of the public’s perception of dinosaurs, according to The Guardian
  • The Guardian‘s list of the five best dinosaur movies
  • The Guardian‘s list of the five best dinosaur books
  • A review of the dinosaur game, Ark, by Steamed
  • Dinosaur expert reviews dinosaur toys on A.V. Club
  • Mashable shared an a capella version of the Jurassic Park theme song

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